House of the Dragon Producer Says the Show Portrays No Sexual Violence

Photo: HBO

Theories have floated about what could happen in HBO’s highly anticipated Game of Thrones prequel series House of the Dragon. One very crucial question is how, or whether, the show will display any explicit sexual content.

After co-producer Miguel Sapochnik’s testimony on the blowout, Sara Hess, executive producer of House of the Dragon, sets things straight.

Despite Game of Throne’s popularity in portraying sexual violence, Sapochnik told Hollywood Reporter that the approach made in House of the Dragon is done “carefully, thoughtfully, and [we] don’t shy away from it.”

He continued, “If anything, we’re going to shine a light on that aspect. You can’t ignore the violence that was perpetrated on women by men in that time. It shouldn’t be downplayed, and it shouldn’t be glorified.”

The remark was talked about, seeing that it is subject to a civil war at the center of the show because “the patriarchy would rather destroy itself than see a woman on the throne.”

Discussions followed another statement from Sapochnik that childbirth in an ancient fantasy setting is inherently violent and potentially deadly.

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House of the Dragon: Domineered by Men

Many scenes have shown how the show’s female leads – Olivia Cooke’s Lady Alicent Hightower and Emma D’Arcy’s Princess Rhaenyra Targaryen – must compete to make a breakthrough in a world dominated by male kings and lords.

However, the statement serves as a reminder to several readers of the fiery controversies around Game of Thrones’ depiction of violence and left something to think about – whether House of the Dragon would also give us scenes that felt gratuitous.

Responding to the quotes, Hess clarified that the show’s theme treatment will not be as visceral.

“I’d like to clarify that we do not depict sexual violence in the show,” the producer told Vanity Fair. “We handle one instance off-screen, and instead show the aftermath and impact on the victim and the mother of the perpetrator.”

She added, “I think what our show does, and what I’m proud of, is that we choose to focus on the violence against women that is inherent in a patriarchal system.”

House of the Dragon drops on August 21.

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